pinksonia: (train)
It's a little late, but I figure there should be some sort of March round up, even if it is just books read. So, for those there are eight: two physical books, two ebooks, and four audiobooks.

Books )

Then there are some pictures. (1) of the April calendar and (1) to prove that while I did fall down on keeping track of my sticker goals, I did manage to not bite my nails for the month of March.

Pictures )
pinksonia: (Default)
I don't know how well known this youtube video is outside of New Orleans.



It was doing the rounds here about a year ago because we have all shopped at that Walmart (it's the Tchoupitoulas street if anyone cares).

Anyway, my co-historic analyst likes to look at the NOPD crime reports during lunch. Today they reported that the "singer" in that video was in a multi-hour standoff with the police yesterday after threatening to kill his neighbor. That lead us of a youtube search to see if he had any other songs which ultimately resulted in this, an acoustic version of Wally World. We we cracking up for a good 10 minutes.



I can even.

Q4: Book you hate )
pinksonia: (Default)
I can't believe these socks are the first project I've finished since July. During the winter I was getting two to four projects done a month plus working on two larger projects. Now just the one (and a couple others in various half done states still on the needles).

Photobucket

Anyway, for these I used the 'Severus Loves Lily' yarn that I got in my HP Swap box from the Odd Ducks. I was going to use it to make a scarf to go with my winter coat (which is also bright green) but the two green were slightly different hues. Instead I pulled this sock pattern (which is called, appropriately enough 'Nagini') out of my queue.

I like them. Though I don't understand why most sock patterns want you to stop mid-calf. I don't like my socks that high, and I can't imagine that it is ever attractive. But that's fine, it just means that I have a good amount of the yarn left over to do something else with -- probably some faire isle mittens.

Q3: Your favourite book )
pinksonia: (Default)
First off, thanks for the podcast recs. I will be checking them out!

Next, I've been watching Playing Shakespeare which appears to be a television documentary from the 80s with lots of well respected actors and actresses. I'm finding it pretty interesting, but what I've really come away from the program with is a sense of awe at just how intelligent some of them seem (mostly Ian McKellen and Ben Kingsley). It is really rather refreshing to be impressed with someone out of character instead of kind of cringing. Now I want to see ALL THE PLAYS, which would be easier if my lot in life was not to have Macbeth playing near me all the time and rarely anything else -- I don't know what is up with that.

And then Book!Meme Day Two:

The book you want to read next
Hmm. Let's see )
pinksonia: (Default)
First off, I'm going to say hi to the latest group of people I've picked up in a friending meme. Welcome, and I hope I don't disappoint you too badly as a friend.

Next, Anyone have any good recommendations for podcasts? I prefer listening to the spoken word rather than to music at work (I have a tendency to have to sing along dramatically to any music that plays, so I get a lot of people laughing at me singing silently with exaggerated facial expressions if I listen to music at work.) Right now I'm really loving Popstuff from HowStuffWorks since it hits my love of anthropological studies of western subcultures (though not so in depth as I would usually like). I'm also a huge fan of The Savage Lovecast (and quote it all the time, which may be weird) and Stuff You Missed in History Class, also from HowStuffWorks, if that helps narrow down the kind of thing I like. I am particularly looking for something to take the place of The Broadway Bullet which I loved but died after the show runner moved back to Montana (where it is slightly more difficult to report on the happenings of New York theater.

Finally, I am going to do the book!meme from [livejournal.com profile] bookishgeek but as a thirty(one)-day meme instead of a oneshot deal -- because I like books and I feel like it.

So.....
A book you are reading right now
There are 5-ish )
pinksonia: (Default)
Happy New Year Everyone!
Okay, now that is out of the way.  I quite possibly had the most boring New Years Eve ever in which I drank champagne while reading Hard Times and then fell asleep at something like 8:15.  The fireworks woke me up at 12:30 at which point I continued to read for a couple hours and then went back to sleep.  Yup, that is me -- consummate wild child.  hmm. 

Has anyone else signed up for the goodreads.com yearly reading challenge.  It looks super low-key (by which I mean it looks like they keep track for you), which is awesome, since I'm likely to forget about it.  But 30 should be a good number.  I'm sure I can get through 2.5 books a month, particularly if I count, and continue to listen to books on tape at work. 
Otherwise I am staying away from the resolutions (except possibly the one about being nominated for insane participation in the Claw in-house superlatives at HiH.)
pinksonia: (Default)
Happy New Year Everyone!
Okay, now that is out of the way.  I quite possibly had the most boring New Years Eve ever in which I drank champagne while reading Hard Times and then fell asleep at something like 8:15.  The fireworks woke me up at 12:30 at which point I continued to read for a couple hours and then went back to sleep.  Yup, that is me -- consummate wild child.  hmm. 

Has anyone else signed up for the goodreads.com yearly reading challenge.  It looks super low-key (by which I mean it looks like they keep track for you), which is awesome, since I'm likely to forget about it.  But 30 should be a good number.  I'm sure I can get through 2.5 books a month, particularly if I count, and continue to listen to books on tape at work. 
Otherwise I am staying away from the resolutions (except possibly the one about being nominated for insane participation in the Claw in-house superlatives at HiH.)
pinksonia: (Benny - archaeologist)
In my voice thing, I talked about the latest book I'm reading which is Alex Miller's Journey to the Stone Country.  My mother gave to to me on my last trip home thinking I would enjoy it, which I am.  The people in it share my profession and more surprisingly share the aspect of it I'm in.  They are doing cultural survey ahead of a planned reservoir.  Of course there are differences -- I would never do that much camping (but then I don't camp), and there is a lot more "ped" survey (field walking) than I ever get to do, but every once in while a bit jumps out at me as something I or my co-workers would do or say.  Particularly one portion when two characters are arguing over whether or not early European settlement sites are equally deserving of conservation.  Oh, the historic vs. pre-historic debate. 


Anyway, here's a passage I enjoyed...
"It's the decay and abandonment that moves us in the first place, isn't it? About places like this? It's what makes them so poignant for us.  When we conserve them they lose all that.  We polish them up and cherish them.  We banish their ghosts and make them safe for the future.  We falsify them.  Conserved things become part of our present.  They become ordinary. The very thing we set out to conserve is the thing we inevitably destroy.  We keep the fabric but we lose the spirit.  It's one thing to record the past, but it's something else to conserve it.  I'm not sure I believe in the conservation of places like this."
pinksonia: (Benny - archaeologist)
In my voice thing, I talked about the latest book I'm reading which is Alex Miller's Journey to the Stone Country.  My mother gave to to me on my last trip home thinking I would enjoy it, which I am.  The people in it share my profession and more surprisingly share the aspect of it I'm in.  They are doing cultural survey ahead of a planned reservoir.  Of course there are differences -- I would never do that much camping (but then I don't camp), and there is a lot more "ped" survey (field walking) than I ever get to do, but every once in while a bit jumps out at me as something I or my co-workers would do or say.  Particularly one portion when two characters are arguing over whether or not early European settlement sites are equally deserving of conservation.  Oh, the historic vs. pre-historic debate. 


Anyway, here's a passage I enjoyed...
"It's the decay and abandonment that moves us in the first place, isn't it? About places like this? It's what makes them so poignant for us.  When we conserve them they lose all that.  We polish them up and cherish them.  We banish their ghosts and make them safe for the future.  We falsify them.  Conserved things become part of our present.  They become ordinary. The very thing we set out to conserve is the thing we inevitably destroy.  We keep the fabric but we lose the spirit.  It's one thing to record the past, but it's something else to conserve it.  I'm not sure I believe in the conservation of places like this."
pinksonia: (good book)
Does anyone else use Goodreads?  I like it as a way to keep track of the books I read each year -- much better than my old word document method.  Anyway, I've been a member of the Adults reading Young Adult Fiction group (called Wildthings) for about a year now.  I think I'm in the minority in that group due to the fact that I am neither a teacher nor a mother, but reading through the messages has prompted me to thank my mother numerous times over the last year for the way she raised me. 

Many of the people (mostly women) who post in the group do so because they read every book their child reads in order to  make sure the themes are appropriate.  Now, I'm not a mother, so I can only come at this situation from the view point of the child, but I would have stopped reading or I would have become the biggest sneak imaginable -- hiding every book I found regardless of how "appropriate" it might have been.  Then again,  I am and have always been a very private person. 

I come from a huge family of readers.  We trade books all the time.  No family get together is complete without an exchange of books accompanied by an "I think you'll like this,"  if fact every time I visit my parents I am greeted by a new stack of books in my childhood room, things my parents have read since the last time I was home and think I might like.  My grandmother does the same thing but with articles which can be sent through the mail.  Still, all through my childhood I can only remember reading two things around the same time as my mother: Christy when the television series came out and Anne of Green Gables and its sequels right before we went to Prince Edward Island on vacation.  The first book even involves an instance of Statutory rape, but there was never a sense that I couldn't read it or that we needed to have a "very special" discussion about it.  I was allowed to read whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted, and trusted to get things or not get them. 

So, once again -- thank you Mom (and Dad) for your hands off approach to my reading material growing up.  Thank you for taking me to the library often, and for letting me check out anything that looked interesting. 
pinksonia: (good book)
Does anyone else use Goodreads?  I like it as a way to keep track of the books I read each year -- much better than my old word document method.  Anyway, I've been a member of the Adults reading Young Adult Fiction group (called Wildthings) for about a year now.  I think I'm in the minority in that group due to the fact that I am neither a teacher nor a mother, but reading through the messages has prompted me to thank my mother numerous times over the last year for the way she raised me. 

Many of the people (mostly women) who post in the group do so because they read every book their child reads in order to  make sure the themes are appropriate.  Now, I'm not a mother, so I can only come at this situation from the view point of the child, but I would have stopped reading or I would have become the biggest sneak imaginable -- hiding every book I found regardless of how "appropriate" it might have been.  Then again,  I am and have always been a very private person. 

I come from a huge family of readers.  We trade books all the time.  No family get together is complete without an exchange of books accompanied by an "I think you'll like this,"  if fact every time I visit my parents I am greeted by a new stack of books in my childhood room, things my parents have read since the last time I was home and think I might like.  My grandmother does the same thing but with articles which can be sent through the mail.  Still, all through my childhood I can only remember reading two things around the same time as my mother: Christy when the television series came out and Anne of Green Gables and its sequels right before we went to Prince Edward Island on vacation.  The first book even involves an instance of Statutory rape, but there was never a sense that I couldn't read it or that we needed to have a "very special" discussion about it.  I was allowed to read whatever I wanted, whenever I wanted, and trusted to get things or not get them. 

So, once again -- thank you Mom (and Dad) for your hands off approach to my reading material growing up.  Thank you for taking me to the library often, and for letting me check out anything that looked interesting. 
pinksonia: (good book:: eyesthatslay)
So lately I've been obsessed with Goodreads.  I'm not big on social networking sites except when the make something easier for me.  I like Ravelry for finding knitting patterns and Goodreads for finding books, and there is nothing I like better than a good book.  Anyway, the obsession came in when I joined the group "Wild Things" which is all about young adult books.  They're running a challenge (which my co-workers have decided to call a scavenger hunt) where you read books to finish certain tasks like a book based on a fairy tale, or a book published in the year you were born.  Each task is assigned a certain number of points and ties in points are settled by number of pages read.  Long story short, I've read five books since Monday. 



pinksonia: (good book:: eyesthatslay)
So lately I've been obsessed with Goodreads.  I'm not big on social networking sites except when the make something easier for me.  I like Ravelry for finding knitting patterns and Goodreads for finding books, and there is nothing I like better than a good book.  Anyway, the obsession came in when I joined the group "Wild Things" which is all about young adult books.  They're running a challenge (which my co-workers have decided to call a scavenger hunt) where you read books to finish certain tasks like a book based on a fairy tale, or a book published in the year you were born.  Each task is assigned a certain number of points and ties in points are settled by number of pages read.  Long story short, I've read five books since Monday. 



pinksonia: (good book:: eyesthatslay)
I keep meaning to post things and then forgetting, which results in lots of blank space.  So, instead of just leaving it off as I usually do, there is a chance that I will add my weekend in a quick succession of posts.  You have been warned. 

First off, Wednesday night was the inaugural meeting of the "Open Hat Book Club."  The hat being open not the book club itself.  I'm pleased to report that my method of choosing books worked every bit as well as I thought it would.  When Arynne first shared that she was going to start a reading group I suggest that each member submit two books to the list.  The first would be a book they had already read and thought that everyone else should read.  The second would be a book that they wanted to read.  I used to phrase that second one as a book they always wanted to read, but that wording tends to make people feel that they have to choose classics which is not at all the point.  Thankfully, we did in fact have a group with diverse reading tastes, as I had hoped, so our list runs the gamut.  There's fiction and non-fiction, biography, children's lit, a graphic novel, some classics, some best sellers, and even some trash.  Okay, I know I shouldn't pass judgment, but really, The Cheerleader !?

Our first book is Alexandra Fuller's Don't Lets Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood. I've already procured my copy (mostly because the Borders had neither the DVD for the newest Jane Eyre nor that of the Casanova miniseries which is what I wanted to spend my gift cards on), and will be starting my new reading adventure this ten-day.

I believe my book I think everyone should read is sceduled third.  I can't wait.  I submitted 84 Charing Cross Road.  I really wanted it to be the first book because nothing starts off a club about books like read a book about the love of books.  But, mostly I just want everyone to love Helene Hanff.  I'm on a one woman crusade (a pretty pitiful one at that) to get my favorite book, Letter from New York, back into print.  I'm sure that crusade will have about as much luck as the one to re-introduce the word "fortnight" into American-English. 

pinksonia: (good book:: eyesthatslay)
I keep meaning to post things and then forgetting, which results in lots of blank space.  So, instead of just leaving it off as I usually do, there is a chance that I will add my weekend in a quick succession of posts.  You have been warned. 

First off, Wednesday night was the inaugural meeting of the "Open Hat Book Club."  The hat being open not the book club itself.  I'm pleased to report that my method of choosing books worked every bit as well as I thought it would.  When Arynne first shared that she was going to start a reading group I suggest that each member submit two books to the list.  The first would be a book they had already read and thought that everyone else should read.  The second would be a book that they wanted to read.  I used to phrase that second one as a book they always wanted to read, but that wording tends to make people feel that they have to choose classics which is not at all the point.  Thankfully, we did in fact have a group with diverse reading tastes, as I had hoped, so our list runs the gamut.  There's fiction and non-fiction, biography, children's lit, a graphic novel, some classics, some best sellers, and even some trash.  Okay, I know I shouldn't pass judgment, but really, The Cheerleader !?

Our first book is Alexandra Fuller's Don't Lets Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood. I've already procured my copy (mostly because the Borders had neither the DVD for the newest Jane Eyre nor that of the Casanova miniseries which is what I wanted to spend my gift cards on), and will be starting my new reading adventure this ten-day.

I believe my book I think everyone should read is sceduled third.  I can't wait.  I submitted 84 Charing Cross Road.  I really wanted it to be the first book because nothing starts off a club about books like read a book about the love of books.  But, mostly I just want everyone to love Helene Hanff.  I'm on a one woman crusade (a pretty pitiful one at that) to get my favorite book, Letter from New York, back into print.  I'm sure that crusade will have about as much luck as the one to re-introduce the word "fortnight" into American-English. 

pinksonia: (good book:: eyesthatslay)
And here is another meme that is going around everywhere.  I got it from [personal profile] mcgarrygirl78 and [profile] loversandtrends.  Anyway this one is about books - yea books!
1) Look at the list and bold those you have read.
2) Italicize those you intend to read.
3) Underline the books you LOVE.
4) Reprint this list in your own LJ so we can try and track down these people who've read 6 and force books upon them ;-)


*Edited to fix the strange italics problem*
pinksonia: (good book:: eyesthatslay)
And here is another meme that is going around everywhere.  I got it from [personal profile] mcgarrygirl78 and [profile] loversandtrends.  Anyway this one is about books - yea books!
1) Look at the list and bold those you have read.
2) Italicize those you intend to read.
3) Underline the books you LOVE.
4) Reprint this list in your own LJ so we can try and track down these people who've read 6 and force books upon them ;-)


*Edited to fix the strange italics problem*

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